Sorry! Loadin' up.

"Writer’s block is a tool — use it. When asked why you haven’t produced anything lately, just say, “I’m blocked.” Since most people think that writing is some mystical process where characters “talk to you” and you can hear their voices in your head, being blocked is the perfect cover for when you just don’t feel like working. The gods of creativity bless you, they forsake you, it’s out of your hands and whatnot. Writer’s block is like “We couldn’t get a baby sitter” or “I ate some bad shrimp,” an excuse that always gets you a pass."

imabookglutton:

All bookworms know that. :D

"If growing up means it would be beneath my dignity to climb a tree, I’ll never grow up, never grow up, never grow up! Not me!"
J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan (via noseinabook-)
"Reading is a staple of life, like bread or water. Or chocolate."
Rett MacPherson, A Misty Mourning (via bookoasis)
"If you take a book with you on a journey,…an odd thing happens: The book begins collecting your memories. And forever after you have only to open that book to be back where you first read it. It will all come into your mind with the very first words: the sights you saw in that place, what it smelled like, the ice cream you ate while you were reading it…yes, books are like flypaper—memories cling to the printed page better than anything else."
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke (via bookstorecouture)
"We never stop reading, although every book comes to an end, just as we never stop living, although death is certain."
Roberto Bolaño, Last Evenings on Earth, trans. Chris Andrews (via proustitute)
"Picking five favorite books is like picking the five body parts you’d most like not to lose."
Neil Gaiman (via thebooknookers)

in-somnisveritas:

Banned Books Week

I’ve never heard of this before, but honestly, it’s inspiring.  The last week of September is Banned Books Week.  Basically, I see it as a week of challenging what it means to have freedom of speech.  Some of the books on this list are amazing.  

I read Speak as a 7th grade summer reading book.  I do not believe this book advocates premarital sex/inappropriate behavior.  It’s a book about gathering up the courage to speak up for yourself.  It’s about a young girl’s mental battle after being raped, and how she finally musters the strength to say no and tell someone about it.  

The Diary of Anne Frank?  That’s real history.  

The Hunger Games?  Honestly?  

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close?  One of the most amazing books I have ever read.  The writing is inspiring.  The characters are compelling.  The story is told by an innocent, hurting boy who lost his father to the 9/11 attacks.  I read this in school.  

Catcher in the Rye?  The most classic coming of age novel.  I think this is the type of book that people of all ages can relate to on a different level.  It’s the book to read in high school and relate to, then read again in college and see it completely differently, then read again as an adult and take it a totally different way.

They said Crank by Ellen Hopkins was one of the most challenged books of the year.  But this book does not glorify drugs, drinking, or sex.  It wakes people up to the reality of what bad choices can do to a life.  And not only a life, but everyone’s.  Crank tells the story as it is, as it is highly based off of the author’s own life and her daughter’s struggle with these drugs.  I believe Ellen Hopkins is simply a mother who knows what drugs can do, and who wants to tell people what really goes on.  

I can understand why parents would challenge Perks of Being a Wallflower, mainly due to sexual content.  But I believe this is our generation’s Catcher in the Rye.  It’s the modern day coming of age book. 

What the people who challenge these books have to realize is, that, despite their belief that these themes are not “age appropriate” or contain “mature themes,” this is what kids deal with.  Wouldn’t you rather them know what drugs really does to a family rather than try it themselves?  Wouldn’t you rather kids learn that it’s okay to speak up for themselves?  

Be a part of Banned Books week.  Challenge restrictions on the expression of ideas through writing.  Read.